About

Welcome to Ground Control Parenting, a blog for parents of children of color, with a particular focus on our boys.

We all know the statistics on the abysmal graduation rates for Black and Latino boys, but here at Ground Control Parenting we are especially concerned about the underachievement of the boys who do graduate from high school.  We want to share information and resources on what works to spark the love of learning for our boys, keep them engaged in school from nursery through high school and ensure that they excel.  We also want to support and inspire parents, as we all go about the challenging business of guiding our sons through school and life during these formative years.

GCP is written by Carol Sutton Lewis. I am an African American mom with children ranging in age from 13 to 20.  Personally and through my children I have experienced public schools (regular and selective) and single sex private schools.  My mom is a retired public school teacher, and I benefited greatly from her focus (along with my dad’s focus) on my education. While I still have many questions than answers about the parenting process, I have over fifteen years of experience focusing on educational and developmental issues affecting boys of color.

Here are a few more details about me:

Carol Sutton Lewis, Blog Author, lives in New York City with her husband and three children: a daughter in college, a son in high school and another son in middle school.  Her daughter graduated from a specialized public school, and her sons have attended private school since kindergarten.  Carol, a former practicing attorney, is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Stanford Law School.  She is a member of the board of trustees of several educational organizations, including a New York City private school, Stanford Law School and Early Steps, an organization devoted to increasing the presence of students of color in New York City private schools.

Ground Control Parenting – Helping boys soar!

20 responses to “About

  1. Wendy Van Amson

    Congratulations and good luck to both of you. I am looking forward to more information to share and future collaborations with you.
    Wendy – co-founder of ISDN
    Independent School Diversity Network

  2. Wow. Thanks for filling a void in our discussion about education. We need you and we need this.

    Please discuss how to encourage, motivate, inspire, tough love our young people particularly our sons from settling for living at home as opposed to surviving and thriving outside of our basements!

    I look forward to more!

  3. Rozlyn Anderson Flood

    Congratulations on beginning an important dialogue on the ways to close the achievement gap and to keep our young men motivated and engaged.

    I was raised by a former teacher who was a warrior for my education. She motivated me with the mantra: “Always do more than the teacher asks.” As a parent I tried to emulate her methods – speaking her mantra – which worked with one son but failed with the other. Fortunately both are now having very successful college careers. However, I remain curious as to why some things worked for one son and not the other. I would appreciate an exploration of topics that address disparities among children of the same family and how parents can modify tactics accordingly.

    Also, I’m currently reading “The Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.” Although the book has received much criticism, I’m curious if any “tiger mother” methods work if modified. I have discussed parenting with both Chinese and South Asian friends, comparing cultural differences and what works and doesn’t work. This blog could potentially host a multicultural dialogue among many parents of color – a review of “best practices,” if you will. This type of sharing might help us collectively come up with many solutions.

  4. Brava!

    Thank you for pointed discussions around our amazing young men of color.

    Will share your blog with RIISE community to support dialogue.

    Since you asked…
    What’s working for my guy??? KARATE-discipline-focus-empowerment!

  5. Lisa and Carol,
    This is wonderful, but I expected that from you. I look forward to dialogue about helping African-American males navigate relations (staff and students) in majority White private schools.

  6. Susan Mobley

    Lisa and Carol:

    This is a fantastic idea and a quality execution. I look forward to reading what I know will be great insights into helping our boys soar to even greater heights! Congratulations on taking a great idea and making it into a reality that will help many.

  7. Linda Gadsby

    Lisa, what a fabulous idea! I look forward to reading more insights from you and Carol! We need all the help we get get raising our boys in this complicated and sometimes treacherous world. Kudos!

  8. Dear Lisa, Harry Allen just connected me to your blog. I did not know you were blogging about parenting issues – congratulations! I have also been blogging about parenting issues for the last few years, both on my own blog and on a number of other blogs, including CocoaMamas.com. I look forward to reading advice and insights from you and Carol.

  9. Pingback: Montessori Featured on Important Education Blog by Two Awesome Moms | SuperDrMaria.com

  10. Quay Watkins

    Hi Lisa & Carol,

    Wendy connected me to your blog. Thanks Wendy! As the parent of a 15 year old son I am thrilled and so grateful to both of you for creating this much needed resource. I am also the executive director of the Boys & Girls Club in New Rochelle and see first hand how we are loosing our boys to this pervasive culture of mediocrity and underachievement. I look forward to our conversations and sharing of ideas and resources.

  11. Charles

    This sounds wonderful. Best of luck to you both. I’m looking forward to your continued efforts!

  12. seo

    Hello! This is my 1st comment here so I just wanted to give a quick shout out and say I genuinely enjoy reading your posts. Can you recommend any other blogs/websites/forums that deal with the same topics? Thanks for your time!

    • Hi,

      Welcome to GCP!!! Glad you like our posts, please keep reading and commenting! GCP was born because we couldn’t find sites which focused on many of the issues covered here, especially issues relating to the education and parenting of African American boys. However, there are many good parenting sites out there, some of which we mention in the recent post “Noteworthy Sites for Parents: The List Begins”. Check out the sites mentioned there. We will be adding to this list, and be sure to let us know if you have any sites to add as well. Thanks for your comment.

  13. You have a wonderful blog. Keep up the good work! Wendy and I have included a link to your site. It would be great if you could include a link to our new site – Independent School Diversity Network (ISDN) – ISDNetwork.org. Much appreciated.

    Best,
    Esther
    Co-Founder/Director ISDN

  14. Robert Michael Franklin

    The Men of Morehouse are grateful for you posting “The Great Debate,” that highlights our recent match with Yale. As we approach the May 17 anniversary (60th) of Brown v. Board of Education, it is great to be reminded of the NAACP’s historic commitment to promoting a culture of learning, academic achievement and intellectual competition. DuBois would be pleased.

  15. Deb Richards

    I accidently came across your site while searching for resouces for my 13-year old. He will enter high school this fall and I want to help him prepare over the summer. Thanks for the wonderful information thus far. Looking forward to more!

    Deb Richards

  16. Lynda Goodwyn

    Love your blog Carol. Will definitely share. Take care! …lynda

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s